top of page

Group

Public·8 members
Alexander Gray
Alexander Gray

Young Mother 5



Lina Marcela Medina de Jurado (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈlina meˈðina]; born 23 September 1933)[1] is a Peruvian woman who became the youngest confirmed mother in history when she gave birth on 14 May 1939, aged five years, seven months, and 21 days.[1][2] Based on the medical assessments of her pregnancy, she was less than five years old when she became pregnant, which was possibly due to precocious puberty.[3]




Young Mother 5


Download Zip: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Furlin.us%2F2udTEZ&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw1n3qA_hUzGP_7kDPSWZM65



Six weeks after the diagnosis, on 14 May 1939, Medina gave birth to a boy by caesarean section. She was 5 years, 7 months, and 21 days old,[1] the youngest person in history to give birth. The caesarean birth was necessitated by her small pelvis. The surgery was performed by Lozada and Dr Busalleu, with Dr Colareta providing anaesthesia. The doctors found she had fully mature sexual organs from precocious puberty.[2] Dr. Edmundo Escomel reported her case in the medical journal La Presse Médicale, including that her menarche had occurred at eight months of age, in contrast to previous reports that she had had regular periods since the age of three[1][7][8] or two and a half.[2]


Medina's son weighed 2.7 kg (6.0 lb; 0.43 st) at birth and was named Gerardo after her doctor. He was raised believing Medina to be his sister before finding out at age 10 that she was his mother.[1] After initially remaining with the family, Lozada was allowed to take custody of the son at Lozada's home in Lima. Subsequently, he employed Lina at his clinic in Lima (where she also resided), though Lina was only able to see her son occasionally.[9] Her son grew up healthy, but died in 1979 at the age of 40 from bone marrow disease.[1][10]


In young adulthood, Medina worked as a secretary in the Lima clinic of Lozada, which gave her an education and helped put her son through high school.[11][12] She married and had a second son in 1972.[13] In 2002, she refused an interview with Reuters,[2] just as she had turned away many reporters in years past.[11]


In her young adulthood, she found work as a secretary for the doctor who attended the birth, which paid her way through school. At roughly the same time, Lina managed to put Gerardo through school as well.


Police say that when the young mother tried to run out through her passenger door, the driver of a semi-truck without a trailer attached hit Daniels. The impact sent the 29-year-old into traffic, where she was hit by another car.


Dr. Hipolito Larrabure, head of the maternity hospital, who aided Dr. [Geraldo] Lozada [director of the Pisco Hospital] during the [Cesarean] operation, said Lina withstood the operation in excellent manner. Medical circles here were astonished at the birth, which they believed without precedent. Dr. Larrabure said the case was "truly astounding" and added that he hoped "some United States scientific foundation will send an investigator to Lima to observe the case and indicate the best manner of caring for the mother and child."4


The possibility of a girl becoming a mother at the age of 5, as reported on Sunday from Lima, Peru, was upheld today by Dr. Joseph B. De Lee, obstetrics authority of Chicago Lying-in Hospital.Dr. De Lee cited the case of a Russian girl who became a mother at the age of 6. According to the physician who reported the case in a German medical journal, Dr. De Lee said, the mother had the physical development of a girl 10 or 12 years old.5


While in Lima Dr. [S.L. Christian, assistant surgeon general of the U.S. Public Health Service] examined Lina Medina, the Indian child-mother whose baby was born last May when the mother was about 5 years old. He said that although there was some confusion as to whether the mother was 5 or 6, there was no doubt of the authenticity of the case, which he described as the most amazing thing in his career as a physician.6


The following year the New York Times reported in a follow-up article that a trip was being organized so Lina could be "brought to the United States within a month for examination by a five-man medical commission." Plans called for the little mother, the baby boy, and the girl's parents to travel to Chicago, but there was no follow-up indicating that the Medina family ever made the journey to the U.S.7 In 1941, two years after Lina give birth, the New York Times published an account of an American psychologist who had examined Lina while visiting South America:


Lina's boy, named Gerardo (after Dr. Gérado Lozada, chief physician of the hospital in Pisco where Lina's pregnancy was diagnosed), did not learn until he was 10 years old that the woman he thought to be his sister was in fact his mother. Gerardo died in 1979, but Lina's second son, born in 1972 (thirty-three years after his brother), now lives in Mexico. Lina and her husband currently reside in the "Little Chicago" district of Lima, Peru.9


The young mother of five children was run over during a street fight on the west side last Wednesday. San Antonio police have since arrested the driver 36-year-old Pennie Gomez in connection with Lopez's death.


Teen mothers are also at risk for developing symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, mainly because of their high risk for community and interpersonal violence exposure.23,24 One study found that on average, teenage mothers had experienced >5 traumatic events, including physical attacks by a partner, neglect, abuse by a parent, incarceration, and traumatic loss. Almost 50% of the adolescent parents in this study met full criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder.25 Compared with adult mothers, adolescent mothers are 2 to 3 times more likely to be victimized by their partner, the father of their child, or a family member.26,27


Rusty stated that he believed that Yates would be fine, since she would only be alone with the children for an hour between the time he left for work and the time when his mother was due to arrive to help her. Rusty, a former NASA engineer, divorced Andrea after the killings. He later remarried and had a son with his second wife. According to media reports, she filed for divorce in 2017.


  • Global Accelerated Action for the Health of Adolescents (AA-HA!)

  • Preventing early pregnancy and poor reproductive outcomes among adolescents in developing countries

  • WHA resolution: Youth and health risks

  • Early marriages, adolescent and young pregnancies - Report to the World Health Assembly



Tulare County Sheriff Mike Boudreaux said the teenager was fleeing the violence early Monday when the killers caught up to her outside the home in Goshen, a central California community of about 3,000 residents in the agricultural San Joaquin Valley, and shot the young mother and her child "assassination-style."


Deputies found more victims inside the home, including the grandmother. Down the street they discovered the teen mom and her baby. A forensics investigation revealed she had tried to run away before the shooter caught up with her and stood over her and fired multiple rounds into her skull, Boudreaux said.


The victims were found inside the house. The children ranged in age from 4 to 17 and included three girls and two boys, authorities said. The other victim was Tausha Haight's 78-year-old mother, Gail Earl.


He was in Boy Scouts as a young boy and earned the "Faith in God" award as a fourth grader. Two years later in 1992, another newspaper article showed that he had won a "Gospel in Action" award from his church.


Heavenly Father, I come to you today, humble and exhausted, and ask that you carry my burdens. I pray that you lift my weary spirit and fill me with your love and peace so that I may be restored and renewed in body and mind. Lord, pour your heavenly nourishment into my soul and give me the energy to sustain myself in my role as a mother.


With the birth of my first child, I developed an overwhelming capacity to worry. Through the years, this tendency toward anxiety intensified with each new season of motherhood. The more I worried, the more time I needed to spend in prayer. If you are an anxious mother, like me, turn to this prayer in times of need.


Dear Lord, I know you have a plan for my child and I thank you and praise you for allowing me the gift of being his/her mother. I am frustrated because I want to see the fruits of my labor, Lord. Please give me the patience to continue being obedient to your word in raising my child. Teach me to wait in hope and confidence for you to make your will known in your time.


Background: Young mothers (age 14-24 years), who are often low income, are less likely than other mothers to breastfeed for 6 months. They also are more likely to be diagnosed with aggressive forms of breast cancer; breastfeeding significantly reduces this risk. While adolescent breastfeeding has been investigated from the perspective of the individual, the social ecological model recognizes the influence of factors at multiple levels.


Methods: Using a cross-sectional prospective qualitative design with a community-based participatory research approach, we sought to identify influential factors at each social ecological level: individual, relationship, community, and societal/structural. We used purposeful sampling, and enlisted snowball sampling. We interviewed stakeholder experts ( n = 9) and dyads ( n = 6) consisting of a young mother and her decision-making partner. Groups of young mothers ( n = 6 groups) collectively created community maps while discussing their feelings about infant feeding in different locations. Using collaborative data analysis, we identified themes and categorized barriers and facilitators according to the social ecological levels.


Results: Four meta-themes emerged: roles, place, stigma, and support. While some barriers and facilitators were similar to those experienced by mothers of all ages, participants reported multiple overlapping stigmas, requiring more support.


Conclusion: Young mothers who decide to breastfeed encounter barriers at multiple levels. Policies and programs aiming to increase breastfeeding rates in this group must address these barriers and enlist identified facilitators. 041b061a72


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...
Group Page: Groups_SingleGroup
bottom of page